Syllabus for ME 370 — Systems Analysis & Design

Spring 2015

Course description

This course is an introduction to the mathematical modeling and control of systems of electrical, mechanical, fluid, thermal, and inter-domain (e.g. electro-mechanical) elements. A system dynamical approach is used, which allows different energy domains to be modeled within a unified framework. Analysis includes the time-domain and frequency-domain. Control systems topics include stability, steady-state errors, and root-locus design. (Adapted from the course catalog.)

General information

Instructor
Rico Picone, PhD
Instructor Email
rpicone (at) stmartin (dot) edu
Office Hours
MWF 10 am–11 am, Cebula 103C
Office Hours
MW 1 pm–2 pm, Cebula 103C
Location
Harned 110
Times
MWF 9:00–9:50 am
Website
ME 370 Website
Moodle
ME 370 Moodle
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Textbooks

Derek Rowell and David N. Wormley. System Dynamics: An Introduction. Prentice Hall, 1997.

Norman S. Nise. Control Systems Engineering. Sixth Edition. Wiley, 2010.

Notes

Partial notes will be posted here.

Schedule

The following schedule is tentative.

week topics introduced reading assignment due
general solution of state equations SD Ch 10 Assignment #1
numerical solution of state equations SD Ch 11 Assignment #2
fluid and thermal elements SD Ch 12 Assignment #3
transfer functions SD Chs 4 & 6 Assignment #4
impedance-based modeling SD Ch 13 Assignment #5
sinusoidal frequency response SD Ch 14 Assignment #6
sinusoidal frequency response & frequency domain methods SD Ch 15 Assignment #7
frequency domain methods Assignment #8
Midterm Exam
introduction to control systems CS Ch 1 Assignment #9
control system stability CS Ch 6 Assignment #10
steady-state errors CS Ch 7 Assignment #11
root-locus techniques CS Ch 8 Assignment #12
root-locus design CS Ch 9 Assignment #13
root-locus design Assignment #14
frequency response techniques CS Ch 10 Assignment #15
finals week Final Exam

Assignments

Assignment #1

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. SD Problems 10.1, 10.3, 10.5, and 10.6.
  3. Take the weekly homework quiz.

Assignment #2

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. SD Problems 10.11, 10.12 (use Matlab to verify), 10.14 (use Matlab to verify), and 10.19 (use Matlab to verify).
  3. Take the weekly homework quiz.

Assignment #3

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. SD Problems 12.1, 12.3, 12.5, 12.7, 12.9, 12.10, and 12.15.
  3. Take the weekly homework quiz.

Assignment #4

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. SD Problems 4.11, 4.12, 4.13, 4.14, 5.16, 5.17, and 5.19.
  3. Take the weekly homework quiz.

Assignment #5

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. SD Problems 13.3, 13.5, 13.9, 13.10, and 13.18.
  3. Take the weekly homework quiz.

Assignment #6

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. SD Problems 14.1, 14.3, 14.4, and 14.6.
  3. Take the weekly homework quiz.

Assignment #7

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. SD Problems 14.8 (sketch by hand), 14.9, 14.12, 14.17, and 14.21.

Assignment #8

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. SD Problems 15.2, 15.3, 15.8, 15.10, 15.11, 15.12, 15.13, 15.17, and 15.18 (this last one will probably require some reading of the chapter).
  3. Take the weekly homework quiz. (Due Wednesday.)

Assignment #9 (due Thursday)

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. Nise Problems 6.1, 6.5, 6.11, 6.17, 6.19, 6.23, and 6.31.
  3. Take the weekly homework quiz.

Assignment #10

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. Nise Problems 7.3, 7.5, 7.16, and 7.18, and 7.45 (you'll have to read Section 7.6 for this last one).
  3. Take the weekly homework quiz.

Assignment #11

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. Nise Problems 8.2, 8.3, 8.5, 8.11, and 8.18.
  3. Take the weekly homework quiz.

Assignment #12

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. TBA
  3. Take the weekly homework quiz.

Assignment #13

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. TBA
  3. Take the weekly homework quiz.

Resources

Class resources will be posted here throughout the semester.

Homework, quiz, & exam policies

Homework & homework quiz policies

Weekly homework will be “due” on Fridays, but it will not be turned in for credit. However — and this is very important — each week a quiz will be given that will cover that week’s homework.

Quizzes will be available on moodle each week (as early as I can get them up), and must be completed by Sunday (before midnight). Late quizzes will receive no credit. Multiple attempts may be made on the quizzes (you will receive your mean grade).

Working in groups on homework is strongly encouraged, but quizzes must be completed individually.

Exam policies

The midterm and final exams will be in-class. If you require any specific accommodations, please contact me.

Calculators will be allowed. Only ones own notes and the notes provided by the instructor will be allowed. No communication-devices will be allowed.

No exam may be taken early. Makeup exams require a doctor’s note excusing the absence during the exam.

The final exam will be cumulative.

Grading policies

Total grades in the course may be curved, but individual homework quizzes and exams will not be. They will be available on moodle throughout the semester.

Homework quizzes
25%
Midterm Exam
35%
Final Exam
40%
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Academic integrity policy

Cheating or plagiarism of any kind is not tolerated and will result in a failing grade (“F”) in the course. I take this very seriously. Engineering is an academic and professional discipline that requires integrity. I expect students to consider their integrity of conduct to be their highest consideration with regard to the course material.

Correlation of course & program outcomes

In keeping with the standards of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, each course is evaluated in terms of its desired outcomes and how these support the desired program outcomes. The following sections document the evaluation of this course.

Desired course outcomes

Upon completion of the course, the following course outcomes are desired:
  1. students will have a clear and thorough understanding of concepts, principles, and methods of modeling rotational-mechanical, translational-mechanical, electrical, fluid, and thermal systems;
  2. students will have a clear and thorough understanding of concepts, principles, and methods of modeling the interfaces rotational-mechanical, translational-mechanical, electrical, fluid, and thermal systems;
  3. students will be able to solve equations of state analytically and numerically;
  4. students will be able to derive and apply transfer functions;
  5. students will be able to analyze systems with sinusoidal frequency response methods;
  6. students will be able to analyze systems with frequency domain methods;
  7. students will understand basic control system theory;
  8. students will understand control system stability;
  9. students will understand steady-state errors; and
  10. students will be able to use root-locus techniques and design.

Desired program outcomes

The desired program outcomes are that mechanical engineering graduates have:
  1. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering;
  2. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data;
  3. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs;
  4. an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams;
  5. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems;
  6. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility;
  7. an ability to communicate effectively;
  8. the broad education necessary to understanding the impact of engineering solutions in a global and social context;
  9. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning;
  10. a knowledge of contemporary issues; and
  11. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

Correlation of outcomes

The following table correlates the desired course outcomes with the desired program outcomes they support.
desired program outcomes
A B C D E F G H I J K
desired course outcomes 1