Syllabus for MME 554
Robotics & Automation

Fall 2018

Course description

This course is an introduction to the field of robotics and automation. The first aspect of the course will survey the field of robotics. The second aspect will focus on the analysis and design of feedback control systems, the cornerstone of robotics and automation. The third aspect will be a design project.

General information

Instructor
Rico Picone, PhD
Office Hours
WF 12–1 and MWF 1–2
Location
Robotics Lab
Time
Th 2:00–4:30 pm
Website
554 Website
Moodle
ME 454/554 Moodle

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Textbooks

M.J. Mataric. The Robotics Primer. Massachusetts, 2007.

Norman S. Nise. Control Systems Engineering. Seventh Edition. Wiley, 2015.

Notes

Partial notes will be posted here.

Schedule

The following schedule is tentative.

week topics introduced reading assignment due
robotics, artificial intelligence, controls, ethics RP Chs 1-6
sensors, feedback control, control architectures RP Chs 7-11 Assignment #1
representation, deliberative control, reactive control, hybrid control, behavior-based control, behavior coordination RP Chs 12-17 Assignment #2
remergent behavior, navigation, group robotics, learning, the future of robotics RP Chs 18-22 Assignment #3
review of stability, steady-state error, and gain control Nise 6-8
root locus design Nise 9.1-9.6 Assignment #4
root locus design Nise 10.1-10.5
frequency response techniques Nise 10.6-10.10 Assignment #5
Midterm Exam
frequency response techniques Nise 10.11-10.13
frequency response techniques Nise 11.1-11.3
frequency response design Nise 11.4-11.5 Assignment #6
frequency response design Nise 12.1-12.4
state space design Nise 12.5-12.8 Assignment #7
state space design Nise 13.1-13.6
digital control systems Nise 13.7-13.11 Assignment #8
finals week Final Exam

Assignments

Assignment #1

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. Write a response paper with the following components:
    1. a two-page or more summary of the content (it must be thorough!),
    2. a page or more research on a specific topic from the reading, and
    3. at least two respectable sources cited in the research section.
  3. Submit the response paper on moodle, where we will be discussing the reading and the papers.

Assignment #2

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. Write a response paper with the following components:
    1. a two-page or more summary of the content (it must be thorough!),
    2. a page or more research on a specific topic from the reading, and
    3. at least two respectable sources cited in the research section.
  3. Submit the response paper on moodle, where we will be discussing the reading and the papers.

Assignment #3

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. Write a response paper with the following components:
    1. a two-page or more summary of the content (it must be thorough!),
    2. a page or more research on a specific topic from the reading, and
    3. at least two respectable sources cited in the research section.
  3. Submit the response paper on moodle, where we will be discussing the reading and the papers.

Assignment #4

  1. Solution, pword: 4rx7Qbgx
  2. Do the assigned reading.
  3. Nise Problems 6.2, 6.14, 6.28, 6.31, 7.1, 7.8, 7.15, 7.46 (use MATLAB or Mathematica), 8.2, 8.3, 8.5, and 8.18.
  4. Take the homework quiz by Friday.

Assignment #5

  1. Solution, pword: vAFYi8EB8
  2. Do the assigned reading.
  3. Nise Problems 9.2, 9.3, 9.6, 9.18, 9.21, 9.25. Essentially, a short design problem of each type: PI, lag, lead, PD, PID, lag-lead.
  4. Take the homework quiz by Friday.

Assignment #6

  1. Solution, pword: 1rE5dgUmK7NPJTQM9Xq3nPq
  2. Do the assigned reading.
  3. Nise Problems 10.4 (compare to MATLAB bode plots), 10.5, 10.6, 10.8, 10.10, 10.11, and 10.12.
  4. Take the homework quiz by Friday.

Assignment #7

  1. Solution, pword: NvDts2ItubXKZ5gnP
  2. Do the assigned reading.
  3. Nise Problems 11.3 and 11.4.
  4. Take the homework quiz by Friday.

Assignment #8

  1. Do the assigned reading.
  2. Nise Problems 12.4 and 12.7.
  3. Take the homework quiz by Friday.

Resources

Class resources will be posted here throughout the semester.

Slack

Everyone is required to join the messaging service called “Slack.” We’ll use it to communicate with each other during the semester. The Slack team you need to join is called me454-2017s. That was a signup link, right there.

Video lectures

Video lectures will be available online on my YouTube channel. I recommend subscribing and familiarizing yourself with the playlist for this course.

Graduate student responsibilities

During the “seminar” portion of the course, graduate students have two additional responsibilities: (1) sources for the “research” portion of your weekly reports should be academic sources and (2) one week present your paper.

During the “lecture” portion of the course, graduate students have two additional responsibilities: (1) perform a literature search to understand an aspect of the material covered in greater depth and (2) write a weekly report—one page plus references— summarizing your research, citing least three academic sources.

Project

There is a course project. This page contains the details.

Homework, quiz, & exam policies

Homework, homework quiz, seminar, & paper policies

For the first several weeks, the course will be run as a seminar. There will be required reading, papers, and presentations. For each student taking the course at the graduate level, one week you will be presenting your paper to the class and leading a discussion. The requirements for the papers will be described each week, but will typically be two or more pages of summary and one or more pages of external research on a topic from the reading.

We will be discussing the reading and the papers in class. You will submit a digital copy on Moodle and a paper copy in class.

Once we have moved beyond the seminar portion of the class, we will have weekly homework “due” on Wednesdays, but it will not be turned in for credit. However — and this is very important — each week a quiz will be given that will cover that week’s homework.

Quizzes will be available on moodle each week, and must be completed by Wednesday (before midnight). Late quizzes will receive no credit. Multiple attempts may be made on the quizzes (you will receive your mean grade).

Working in groups on homework is strongly encouraged, but quizzes must be completed individually.

Exam policies

The midterm and final exams will be in-class. If you require any specific accommodations, please contact me.

Calculators will be allowed. Only ones own notes and the notes provided by the instructor will be allowed. No communication-devices will be allowed.

No exam may be taken early. Makeup exams require a doctor’s note excusing the absence during the exam.

The final exam will be cumulative.

Grading policies

Total grades in the course may be curved, but individual homework quizzes and exams will not be. They will be available on moodle throughout the semester.

Homework quizzes/papers/discussion participation
25%
Midterm Exam
20%
Project
25%
Final Exam
30%

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Academic integrity policy

Cheating or plagiarism of any kind is not tolerated and will result in a failing grade (“F”) in the course. I take this very seriously. Engineering is an academic and professional discipline that requires integrity. I expect students to consider their integrity of conduct to be their highest consideration with regard to the course material.

Correlation of course & program outcomes

In keeping with the standards of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, each course is evaluated in terms of its desired outcomes and how these support the desired program outcomes. The following sections document the evaluation of this course.

Desired course outcomes

Upon completion of the course, the following course outcomes are desired:

  1. students will understand the basic concepts of robotics and automation;
  2. students will understand the history and direction of the field of robotics;
  3. students will understand the ethical implications of the field of robotics;
  4. students will understand the basic components in most robots;
  5. students will be able to analyze and design feedback control systems with time-response techniques;
  6. students will be able to analyze and design feedback control systems with frequency-response techniques;
  7. students will be able to analyze and design feedback control systems in state-space form; and
  8. students will be able to analyze and design feedback digital control systems.
  9. students will be able to effectively communicate about the field of robotics and automation.

Desired program outcomes

The desired program outcomes are that mechanical engineering graduates have:

  1. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering;
  2. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data;
  3. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs;
  4. an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams;
  5. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems;
  6. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility;
  7. an ability to communicate effectively;
  8. the broad education necessary to understanding the impact of engineering solutions in a global and social context;
  9. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning;
  10. a knowledge of contemporary issues; and
  11. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

Correlation of outcomes

The following table correlates the desired course outcomes with the desired program outcomes they support.

desired program outcomes
A B C D E F G H I J K
desired course outcomes 1